Monday, 8 May 2017

WHY GO TO JERUSALEM AND MECCA WHEN THE BIBLICAL QUEEN OF SHEBA IS A NIGERIAN?


My search for the birth and burial place of  the Queen of Sheba, The Holy Bible described her as a woman of great wealth, beauty, and power. The Bible did not tell us her origin, but rather it is believed that she is either from Ethiopia or Yemen. It was recorded that she came with “a very great caravan of camels, carrying spices, large quantities of gold and precious stones”. It was also stated that “never again where so many spices brought into Israel as those the Queen of Sheba gave to King Solomon”. In Islamic tradition, she is commonly referred to, as Bilkis, Bilqis, Balqis or Balquis by the Arabs, who believe that she came from the city of Sheba, also called Mareb, in Yemen. In the Quran she is an Ethiopian sun-worshiper involved in the incense trade who converts to Islam. The Baale told me all he knew about Queen Sheba and her origin from Ijebu -Ode. More details coming your way soon - Promoting Nigeria Educational Tourism.


With the 95 year old Baale B. O Olaitan Olugbosi, the Baale of Oke-Eiri, (The Otinwaiyepe 1) in Ijebu Ode


The Queen of Sheba, The Holy Bible described her as a woman of great wealth, beauty, and power. The Bible did not tell us her origin, but rather it is believed that she is either from Ethiopia or Yemen. It was recorded that she came with “a very great caravan of camels, carrying spices, large quantities of gold and precious stones”. It was also stated that “never again where so many spices brought into Israel as those the Queen of Sheba gave to King Solomon”. In Islamic tradition, she is commonly referred to, as Bilkis, Bilqis, Balqis or Balquis by the Arabs, who believe that she came from the city of Sheba, also called Mareb, in Yemen. In the Quran she is an Ethiopian sun-worshiper involved in the incense trade who converts to Islam.


A team of British scientists believes otherwise that she is from Nigeria. In about 1959, Professor Peter Lloyd first made his publication open and called for more research work to trace the Queen of Sheba's birth place. In September 1999 Dr Patrick Darling, a British archaeologist then with Bournemouth University, after years of research work, the team discovered the remains of an ancient kingdom of Queen of Sheba, deep in the Nigerian rainforest of Ori-Eke in Ijebo-Ode. They visited Ijebu-Ode and after years of wandering in the forest, the British scientists discovered what is today referred as the possible burial place of the legendary Queen of Sheba. Historical and archeological studies revealed that there are many links between the Biblical Queen and Bilikisu Sungbo of Ijebu land.
standing by the grave side of Bilikisu




standing at the entrance of the shrine with custodian of the shrine Chief Moses Awofeko


The Queen of Sheba is said to be associated with ivory, eunuchs and gold. Ivory and gold are known to be very abundant in Nigeria at the time, while eunuchs were present in ancient West African palaces. As at the time of the discovery, the place was a spot bare of vegetation in the Nigerian rainforest where tall trees have become entangled with canopy foliage, festooned with spider’s webs and falling leaves, creating a gloom that inhibits vegetation.

Bilikisu or better still the Queen of Sheba traveled to Jerusalem as she had “heard about the fame of Solomon and his relationship to the Lord, and came to test Solomon with hard questions” (1 Kings 10:1). After a meal together, the Queen of Sheba declares how impressed she is with Solomon’s answers, hospitality, and the reputation that preceded him. The story ends with an exchange of resources and the Queen of Sheba returning “with her retinue to her own country” (1 Kings 10:13). (which country?). The Queen of Sheba is mentioned again in the New Testament, by an alternative title, the Queen of the South (Matthew 12:42; Luke 11:31). Jesus refers to her, reaffirming her historical personage, as a means to illustrate the point that, despite being originally pagan in belief and Gentile in race, the Queen of Sheba recognized the truth and reality of God.

the road leading to the shrine



the gully and the fence, her wall of defence


standing in one of the ditch turned green tunnel besides the fence


Part of the forest around the kingdom


Nigerians Tourism educational Ambassador Dr. Raphael James travelled to what use to be that forest to discover what is left of the kingdom of the Queen of Sheba.
At the 'Birikisu Sungbo shrine', Oke-Eri in Ijebu Ode, Ogun State. First I visited the 95 year old Baale B. O Olaitan Olugbosi, the Baale of Oke-Eiri, (The Otinwaiyepe 1) in Ijebu Ode,  Ogun state, I spent two hours with the Baale and he told me all he knew about Queen Sheba and her origin from Ijebu-Ode. After that he assigned me to the custodian of the shrine Chief Moses Awofeko who is probably in his late 70's. and we off we went, first to the shrine and after that to visit the remains of the wall, protecting the kingdom.

The custodian of the shrine told me that history have it that Bilikisu Sungbo was a wealthy, childless widow. Her system of defensive walls and ditches protecting her kingdom is referred to as the 'Sungbo's Eredo'. The total length of fortifications is more than 160 kilometres (99 mi). It consist of a ditch with unusually smooth walls and bank in the inner side of ditch. The height difference between the bottom of the ditch and the upper rim of the bank on the inner side can is about 20 metres (66 ft). It is built of laterite - a typical African soil consisting of clay and iron oxides. Ditch forms an uneven ring around the area of the ancient Ijebu Kingdom, an area approximately 40 kilometres (25 mi) wide in North-South, with the walls flanked by trees and other vegetation, turning the ditch into green tunnel.
The Eredo served a defensive purpose when it was built in 800–1000, a period of political confrontation and consolidation in the southern Nigerian rainforest. It was likely to have been inspired by the same process that led to the construction of similar walls and ditches throughout western Nigeria, including earthworks around Ifẹ̀, Ilesa, and the Benin Iya, a 6,500-kilometre (4,000 mi) series of connected but separate earthworks in the neighboring Edo-speaking region.

remains of the wall of Bilikisu kingdom 800-1000BC

On November 1, 1995 the 'Bilikisu Sungbo's Eredo' site was added, along with the Iya of Benin, to the UNESCO World Heritage Site Tentative List in the Cultural category.
Welcome to the burial site of the wealthy Biblical Queen Sheba’s Lost Kingdom. Welcome to the small, sleepy village of Oke-Eiri, welcome to 'Bilikisu Sungbo's Eredo'.
This sight should be a high income generating tourist site for the federal government and state government of Ogun state. Christian, Muslim and traditional African religions Pilgrims can visit here for spiritual power renewal.

4 comments:

  1. A very great research.
    Big ups to you sir.

    -Vasily

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  2. I always thought the Queen of Sheba is from Africa but l never knew it will hit home for me.

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  3. Good writer and wonderful explanation.. more knowledge to you..

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  4. Yes it is at ijebu ode, good work

    ReplyDelete